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SANTA CLARA, Calif., February 24, 2020 - SANTA CLARA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- McAfee, the device-to-cloud cybersecurity company, today announced it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Light Point Security, LLC, an award-winning pioneer of browser isolation. Upon the close of the acquisition, the Light Point Security team will join McAfee.
Landry's, a U.S. restaurant chain and property owner has disclosed that they were infected with a point-of-sale (POS) malware that allowed attackers to steal customer's credit card information.Landry's owns and operates over 600 restaurants, with 60 well-known brands such as Landry's Seafood, Chart House, Saltgrass Steak House, Bubba Gump Shrimp Co., Claim Jumper, Morton's The Steakhouse, McCormick & Schmick's, Mastro's Restaurant, Rainforest Cafe, Del Frisco's Grill, and many more.
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — Gov. Larry Hogan is taking steps to strengthen cybersecurity in Maryland. Hogan signed an executive order on Tuesday to create a new position called the Maryland Chief Information Security Officer. The Republican governor also said he is forming the Office of Security Management and the Maryland Cybersecurity Coordinating Council. The three will work to improve Maryland’s cybersecurity to improve the state’s ability to address a cybersecurity incident.   For example, the council will help create recommendations for the state to identify and respond to cybersecurity risks and recover from them. It will include state officials from agencies and departments throughout the state. Last month, a cyberattack hit the city of Baltimore’s computer network, affecting functions of local government in Maryland’s largest city.
For almost the past month, key computer systems serving the government of Baltimore, Md. have been held hostage by a ransomware strain known as “Robbinhood.” Media publications have cited sources saying the Robbinhood version that hit Baltimore city computers was powered by “Eternal Blue,” a hacking tool developed by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) and leaked online in 2017. But new analysis suggests that while Eternal Blue could have been used to spread the infection, the Robbinhood malware itself contains no traces of it. On May 25, The New York Times cited unnamed security experts briefed on the attack who blamed the ransomware’s spread on the Eternal Blue exploit, which was linked to the global WannaCry ransomware outbreak in May 2017. That story prompted a denial from the NSA that Eternal Blue was somehow used in the Baltimore attack. It also moved Baltimore City Council President Brandon Scott to write the Maryland governor asking for federal disaster assistance and reimbursement as a result. But according to Joe Stewart, a seasoned malware analyst now consulting with security firm Armor, the malicious software used in the Baltimore attack does not contain any Eternal Blue exploit code. Stewart said he obtained a sample of the malware that he was able to confirm was connected to the Baltimore incident. “We took a look at it and found a pretty vanilla ransomware binary,” Stewart said. “It doesn’t even have any means of spreading across networks on its own.”